Tutorial- How To Paint Kitchen Cabinets- From Orange Oak to White

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MATERIALS
screwdriver
electric mouse sander
a few sheets of sandpaper
cloths (old t-shirts work well)
mask
plastic or canvas drop cloth(s)
painter’s pyramids
primer
paint
foam brushes
mini roller

1) SAND-
Remove all doors and hardware. Sand the fronts and backs of all the doors with an electric sander, we used a mouse sander. Ideally this would be done outside (wearing a mask of course). Hand sand with a sheet of sandpaper to get into all of the grooves and crevices. Use the electric sander on the cabinet frame. If you’re able, partition off your kitchen with masking tape and plastic drop cloths so that the dust is contained to one room. Also make sure to remove any items that you don’t want to get dusty. It’s also a good idea to use a shop vac and have it running alongside the sander and open the windows.

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2) PRIME-
Wipe down all of the doors and frame with a clean damp cloth. Lay down a drop cloth and set the doors up on painter’s pyramids. Use a foam brush and mini roller and to apply the primer. The frame goes fairly quickly with the mini roller. I used Behr’s Enamel Undercoat and Primer since I was using Behr latex paint over it, if you’re using a different paint (ie oil based) you would need a different primer. Make sure and apply the primer evenly, bad brush strokes and mistakes will show through even after you paint (unfortunately this happened on a few doors that I let my husband help me with ). Apply 2-3 coats front and back letting them dry completely in between.

3) PAINT-
Apply 2-3 coats of paint with a foam brush and mini roller. I used Behr Premium Paint in Ultra Pure White (semi-gloss finish). Again, use painter’s pyramids and letting everything dry completely in between coats. When everything is completely dry, carefully rehang the doors and install hardware.

4) MAINTENANCE-
Wipe down cabinets with a damp cloth. Do NOT use a magic sponge (I learned this the hard way unfortunately). Save a small tub of paint for touch ups. It’s been over 3 years since I painted my cabinets and I haven’t had any bleed-through, chips or stains.

 

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